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What do doctoral graduates in arts and humanities do? 2006

Overview

885 graduates received doctoral degrees in arts and humanities subjects in 2004, down from the year before. This survey covers 590 graduates in the subject area. Women made up a small majority of graduates, with 305 respondents, or 51.6% of the total (See Table One). 62.7% of graduates studied full-time, the same proportion as studied full time masters degrees in the subject.

PhD graduatesArts and humanities
Female305
Male285
Respondents590
Total885

Table One: Overview of UK-domiciled PhD graduates in arts and humanities from 2004

Subjects studied

This area is dominated by two main subjects. 22.5% of PhD graduates in the arts and humanities got their doctorate in history, and 17.3% in English. 8.9% received theology degrees.

Other popular subjects include:

  • Archaeology
  • Classics
  • Drama
  • English literature
  • French
  • Linguistics
  • Music
  • Philosophy

Survey response

The proportion of arts and humanities graduates entering work on graduation was very similar to figures for 2003, with 66 % going into work (see Figure One). There was a sharp increase in those going on to combine study with work - 13.9%, compared to 8.6% in 2003. 4.2% went overseas to work or study, down from 6.2% in 2003. Unemployment was down to 3.6% from 4.5%.

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Figure One: Survey responses of UK-domiciled PhD graduates in arts and humanities in 2004

Types of work

465 arts and humanities PhD graduates from 2004 were working six months after graduating. (See Table Two).

The range of occupations was quite narrow, with education dominating - 135 were employed as lecturers, 29.4% of the working total and 70 were working as researchers, equivalent to 15% of the working graduate. A further 22.3% of working arts and humanities graduates were working elsewhere in education jobs. The major non-academic occupation was in management, attracting 7% of arts and humanities graduates.

OccupationNumber of graduatesPercentage of graduating cohort
University and HE lecturers13529.4%
Others in HE357.5%
Further education professionals255.2%
Other education professionals459.7%
University researchers7015.0%
Commercial, industrial and public sector managers357.0%
Librarians and archivists203.9%
Clergy153.2%
Media professionals102.4%
Other professionals5011.2%
Other occupations255.6%
Total465100%

Table Two: Types of work of UK-domiciled doctoral degree graduates from 2004 in arts and humanities subjects working in the UK

Further information

What do masters graduates do? - first destinations for masters graduates from 2004

What do masters graduates in arts and humanities do? - first destinations from 2004 for masters graduates in arts and humanities

What do graduates do? - first destinations for graduates from first degrees in 2004

What do PhDs do? - destination information on PhD graduates from 2003, hosted by UK Grad.

Other subjects

What do doctoral graduates in biomedical sciences do?

What do doctoral graduates in biological sciences do?

What do doctoral graduates in physical sciences do?

What do doctoral graduates in social sciences do?

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